Filling up a screen with a liquid

Max_Raptor
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 5:32 pm

Filling up a screen with a liquid

Postby Max_Raptor » Sun Mar 27, 2011 5:45 pm

Hi all, new here and with Realflow 5 (well any realflow)

I am slowly getting a grip on it with help from misc tuts out there, however
I need to make a sample animation for a project I am working on, in which I want
to fill a 40" screen (Portrait oriented) slowly with liquids, (like you pour water into a glass)
but I don't want any frames or vissible objects except for maybe a pipe or a faucet at the top of the screen from which he water flow untill it get's maybe half full, then (if possible) I want it to drain out again as the water stops flowing from the pipe...

I am wondering if someone is willing to get me on my way as of what to use

like emiters,I tried Fill but that does not do it alone? I tried many different together with gravity but it does not behave as I like..

Last question, I want the output to be full HD quality High rez, but not sure if it matters what size of my objects in RFL when it comes to to actuall rendering output and so on
I don't want the render to take weeks :)


sweeds
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 26, 2011 5:35 pm

Filling up a screen with a liquid

Postby sweeds » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:46 pm

I am actually doing a similar project right now. You may want to check out a new feature in RF5 called Hybrido. It is an advanced grid based simulation that works well for large amounts of liquid simulations. It would be best to look up some tutorials on your own but I can try to give you a quick rundown of how it works, and how to apply it to your situation.

At the top of the screen, directly to the left of the particle fluid menu, is the grid fluid menu. Creating a Grid Fluid Domain will put a cube in your work view. This domain is the container in which all of your Hybrido simulated particles can exist. This will be your 'screen' and you will fill it up with water.

The next step is to create a Grid Fluid Emitter. Grid based systems work a little differently, and their Emitters can be in any shape. Simply import or add any piece of geometry and make sure to put it inside the domain. The geometry you use is the shape of the emitter. With the object selected, go up to the same menu and add a Grid Fluid Emitter.

Run the simulation and see what you get. Now, to get a constant stream of particles you need to select the GridFluidEmitter and set Stream > Yes and an Initial Speed of some thing around 1-5. You should now have a basic setup to create a large volume of particles that viewed from the side angle will look like its filling up higher and higher.

Now there are a lot of details that I left out and are there for you to discover, read about, or ask further questions. Let me know how that goes. I can send you some of my RF files too if you want, although my project includes some other rigid body dynamic features.

Good luck mate.

Max_Raptor
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 5:32 pm

Filling up a screen with a liquid

Postby Max_Raptor » Sun Mar 27, 2011 7:43 pm

Hi and thanks, yes I been thru the Tutorial on youtube (5 parts) using Hybrido
I works partly for what I need, one thing is that it does not seem (or I could not figure out) how it would fill, it pours into the "domain" but I did not see it grow in volume, but I give it another go :)

Is it important how big I make the domain ? does in need to be 20x20x20 meters
or can I make it all smaller and still have a crystal clear render from it ?

sweeds
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 26, 2011 5:35 pm

Filling up a screen with a liquid

Postby sweeds » Sun Mar 27, 2011 8:55 pm

Particles will stay inside of the Domain for as long as the simulation goes on. Make sure you select the Emitter and set it to stream and give it an initial speed. This way it should continue to fill.

As far as crystal clear renders go, scale is all relative. And it really depends on what you are using to render your particles. Generally speaking, increasing the resolution of your Grid Fluid Domain will increase the amount of information and accuracy of your particle simulation. When you bring it into a rendering program (ie Maya, 3Ds MAX, RenderMan, Light Studio etc etc) this is where the clarity and resolution of your images comes into play. When you create the final output you select a high resolution image/video (something like 1920x1080).

So in sum, you can create a domain that is smaller than 20x20x20 and then when you bring it into a rendering program, create images with a higher resolution. Also, take note of the scale of your Domain in the number of particles it takes to fill the entire volume.


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